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Master of Agribusiness

MAB Faculty, MAB Staff and Agricultural Economics Faculty

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MAB Faculty

Vincent Amanor-BoaduVincent Amanor-Boadu
Professor
Ph.D. University of Guelph, 1992
vincent@ksu.edu (785) 532-3520

Vincent Amanor-Boadu is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, and director of the Ag Innovation Center at Kansas State University. He received his PhD from the University of Guelph, in Ontario, Canada. He worked as the Director of Research at the George Morris Centre, Canada’s premier independent agri-food think-tank, where he led research to enhance the agri-food sector’s competitiveness. He was a managing director of AgriFood Innovations, an agri-food technology commercialization services company he co-founded. His current research initiatives encompass entrepreneurship and business development and growth strategy, and strategic management, with special emphasis on inter-organizational relationships and governance. Vincent sits on a number of corporate boards. He says balancing academics with service to industry ensures his ability to bring real-world situations his classroom to illuminate economics and management concepts, and bring research-based solutions to address complex organizational challenges.

Andrew BarkleyAndrew Barkley 
Professor
Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1988
Agricultural and Public Policy
barkley@ksu.edu (785) 341-6333

Dr. Barkley teaches three courses: (1) intermediate microeconomics, and (2) an introductory course in agricultural economics, and (3) applied agribusiness economics in the Master of Agribusiness program. Dr. Barkley’s research interests are in agriculture and related public policy issues. He received a B.A. from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He has taught courses in economics at the University of Chicago, Kansas State University, Quaid-I-Azam University in Islamabad, Pakistan, the University of Arizona, and the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.

Jason BergtoldJason Bergtold 
Associate Professor 
Ph.D. Virginia Tech, 2004 
Production Economics, Natural Resource Economics, Applied Econometrics 
bergtold@ksu.edu (785) 532-0984

Dr. Bergtold’s research includes: the economics of adopting intensive conservation production systems at the farm level; the impact of bio-energy alternatives and feedstock production on-farm; the interaction between agricultural practices, conservation policy and the environment at the farm level; impact of land-use and land cover change across the agricultural landscape in the U.S. and Latin America; and the development of applied discrete choice econometric modeling techniques. In addition, he has completed research examining consumer demand for processed food products and international trade of peanuts. Dr. Bergtold teaches optimization techniques and econometric methods at the graduate level, as well as quantitative methods and introductory agricultural economics at the undergraduate level. 

Allen FeatherstoneAllen Featherstone
Agricultural Economics Department Head, Professor and MAB Program Director
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1986
Finance, Land Markets, Production Economics
afeather@ksu.edu (785) 532-4441

The department’s graduate program has experienced strong growth under the direction of Dr. Featherstone. He guided the development of the Master in Agribusiness degree. His research program has resulted in more than 115 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. As a leading agriculture finance scholar, Dr. Featherstone has assisted the industry on mergers, loan loss severity, the influence of taxes on farm land, and alternative federal tax systems.

Sean FoxJohn (Sean) Fox
Professor
Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1994
Agricultural Policy, Consumer Demand
seanfox@ksu.edu (785) 532-4446

John (Sean) Fox is a native of Ireland and has been on the faculty at K-State since 1994. His B.S. in Agricultural Science is from University College Dublin and his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Iowa State University. He currently serves as Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Agricultural Economics, and has taught classes in Agricultural Policy, International Trade, Commodity Futures Markets, Managerial Economics, and Applied Econometrics. His research is primarily focused on non-market valuation and involves surveys, market experiments, and retail trials in an effort to quantify consumer valuation of food safety and response to new food products, technologies or information. His work has examined demand for food innovations such as irradiation, cloning, genetic modification, and omega-3 enrichment.

Kevin GwinnerKevin Gwinner
Professor and Marketing Department Head, Interim Dean College of Business Administration
Ph.D. Arizona State University, 1997
Marketing Management, Concepts and Research, Services Marketing
kgwinner@ksu.edu (785) 532-2783

Dr. Gwinner is the Head of the Marketing Department at K-State. He teaches Marketing Concepts and Research in the MAB program. His research focuses on: improving and managing the performance of customer-contact employees, organizational citizenship behaviors, consumer relationship benefits and perceptions of rapport, corporate sponsorship of sporting events and electronic word-of-mouth.

Keith HarrisKeith Harris
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, 2012
Economics and Agribusiness Strategy
kdharris@ksu.edu (785) 532-3918

Keith D. Harris is an Assistant Professor of Agribusiness Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University.  His work analyzes of agrifood supply chains within the context of a complex network of differing chain partners and relationships.  As such, the organizational transactions depend on the outcome of other relationships within the chains and networks.  His research area includes agrifood chains for fresh agricultural products (vegetables and fruits) and processed food products (meats and snacks) and it is comprised of growers, auctions, processors, wholesalers, retailers and specialty shops.  Dr. Harris’ research ultimately explores how different companies, who may compete in other chains, collaborate strategically in one or more areas while preserving their own identity and autonomy. Dr. Harris’ academic and industry careers have been dedicated to the food and agriculture industries. He is a food supply chain professional with 20 years of success in global purchasing, and risk management strategies for agricultural commodities. As a practitioner, Dr. Harris held key management responsibilities with companies such as General Mills Inc., Sara Lee Foods Inc., and Smithfield/Farmland Foods before beginning an academic career at Kansas State University. 

Bryan SchurleBryan Schurle
Professor
Ph.D. The Ohio State University, 1977
Risk Management, Production Economics
bschurle@ksu.edu (785) 532-4489

Dr. Schurle has taught courses on finance, optimizing techniques, risk management, and principles of agricultural economics. His interests include the application of computer techniques to agribusiness problems. Dr. Schurle’s research and extension efforts are oriented to finance and farm management issues.

Bill TurnleyBill Turnley
Professor, Management, College of Business Administration
Ph.D. University of South Carolina, 1996
Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
turnley@ksu.edu (785) 532-1339

Bill Turnley is a professor in the Department of Management and the Forrer Chair of Business Ethics. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, a Masters in Business Administration, and a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior, all from the University of South Carolina. Bill teaches courses in Organizational Behavior, Business Ethics and Human Resource Management and is the director of the ConocoPhillips Excellence in Business Ethics Initiative. In addition, he is an active researcher in the areas of psychological contracts, organizational citizenship behavior, and impression management in organizations.

Jeff WilliamsJeff Williams
Professor
Ph.D. Michigan State University, 1980
Farm Management, Risk Management, Natural Resource Economics
jwilliam@ksu.edu (785) 532-4491

Dr. Williams teaches Computer Decision Tools for Agribusiness in the Master of Agribusiness Program. He has worked with several MAB students that have completed economic analyses of investing in new technologies for their agribusiness firms. He also teaches Contemporary Issues in Global Food and Agricultural Systems, Natural Resource and Environmental Economics for undergraduates, and previously taught Advanced Farm Economics for graduate students. Some of his current research includes best management strategies for improving water quality and reducing sedimentation of Kansas reservoirs, evaluating the risk versus returns from alternative cropping and tillage strategies, whole farm revenue insurance and economic issues of biomass production. He is also the recipient of several teaching and research awards.

Christine WilsonChristine Wilson
Professor and Undergraduate Program Director
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2001
Agribusiness, Finance, Marketing, Farm Management
cwilson1@ksu.edu (785) 532-6151

Dr. Wilson’s research interests include the areas of finance, agribusiness, and agribusiness and farm management issues.  Her research has examined factors affecting lenders loan decision making, agricultural input market segments and the buying behavior of producers and consumers, and the valuation of financial records with experimental auctions. She has taught courses in finance, risk, agribusiness marketing management, farm business accounting, and research methods. Prior to joining K-State in August 2008, Dr. Wilson was a faculty member at Purdue University.

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MAB Staff  

Mary BowenMary Bowen
Program Associate
M.P.S. University of Denver, 2013
mjbowen@ksu.edu (785) 532-4435

As Program Associate, Mary Bowen, assists in coordination of and manages activities of the Master of Agribusiness program including communication with applicants, enrolled students, alumni and faculty of the program. Bowen also manages the program’s marketing, special events and international agribusiness tours. She completed a Master’s of Professional Studies in Organizational and Professional Communication (Public Relations and Marketing) from the University of Denver.

Gloria BurgertGloria Burgert
Program Associate
M.S., Purdue University, 2011
gburgert@ksu.edu (785) 532-4435

Originally from Argentina, where she worked in developing banking for the IDB Bank and monitored national and regional projects for a total of $957 million. Previously. she worked with Purdue's Center for Food and Agricultural Business and the distance education MS-MBA program. As MAB Program Associate, she is responsible for curriculum management and assists with program coordination. She earned a Master of Science in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University.

Deborah KohlDeborah Kohl
Program Coordinator
M.S. Kansas State University, 2002
dkohl@ksu.edu (785) 532-4495

Deborah is the Program Coordinator for the MAB program. She manages the day-to-day activities of the Master of Agribusiness program including student recruitment, budget management, Industry Advisory Board interaction and communication with enrolled students. Deborah also assists with the course “Seminar in Agricultural Economics Analysis,” a thesis completion course in the MAB taught by Dr. Allen Featherstone. She completed an M.S. in 2002 at Kansas State University in Secondary Education.

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AgEcon Faculty

Vincent Amanor-BoaduVincent Amanor-Boadu
Professor
Ph.D. University of Guelph, 1992
vincent@ksu.edu (785) 532-3520

Vincent Amanor-Boadu is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, and director of the Ag Innovation Center at Kansas State University. He received his PhD from the University of Guelph, in Ontario, Canada. He worked as the Director of Research at the George Morris Centre, Canada’s premier independent agri-food think-tank, where he led research to enhance the agri-food sector’s competitiveness. He was a managing director of AgriFood Innovations, an agri-food technology commercialization services company he co-founded. His current research initiatives encompass entrepreneurship and business development and growth strategy, and strategic management, with special emphasis on inter-organizational relationships and governance. Vincent sits on a number of corporate boards. He says balancing academics with service to industry ensures his ability to bring real-world situations his classroom to illuminate economics and management concepts, and bring research-based solutions to address complex organizational challenges.

Chatura AriyaratneChatura Ariyaratne
Research Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2001
Production Economics, Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
chatura@ksu.edu (785) 532-3679

Dr. Ariyaratne’s research focuses on explaining productivity and financial differences in agricultural cooperatives and farms in the USA. He has extensive knowledge on international agricultural and Agribusiness development. He has done research on plantation agriculture in Sri Lanka. He has done research relevant to Australian horticulture and irrigation technologies. He is an expert on use of quantitative techniques in agricultural economics and agribusiness research. Currently, he is working on policy implications of reduced availability of irrigation water and rising pumping costs due to groundwater depletion and  the role of changing prices, technology, and climate on aquifer depletion, and the performance and impacts of different water management policies.


Andy BarkleyAndrew Barkley
Professor
Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1988
Agricultural & Public Policy
barkley@ksu.edu (785) 341-6333

Dr. Barkley teaches three courses: (1) intermediate microeconomics, and (2) an introductory course in agricultural economics, and (3) applied agribusiness economics in the Master of Agribusiness program. Dr. Barkley’s research interests are in agriculture and related public policy issues. He received a B.A. from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He has taught courses in economics at the University of Chicago, Kansas State University, Quaid-I-Azam University in Islamabad, Pakistan, the University of Arizona, and the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.

Art BarnabyArt Barnaby
Professor and Extension State Leader
Ph.D. Texas A&M University, 1981
Finance, Government Programs, Crop Insurance and Risk
barnaby@ksu.edu (785) 532-1515

Dr. Barnaby provides educational programs on crop insurance, government commodity programs, and risk throughout Kansas and the USA. His work emphasizes the development of alternative public policies for crop disaster protection. His work with the private sector developed the first revenue insurance contract in 1996. Revenue insurance is a nationally-available insurance contract for farmers. Revenue Protection currently provides more than $10 billion of coverage for America’s farmers. Other research explores the impact of government commodity programs.

David BartonDavid Barton
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1974
Cooperatives, Agribusiness, Marketing, Finance
dbarton@ksu.edu (785) 532-1508

Dr. Barton is Professor Emeritus of Agribusiness Management and Director Emeritus of the Arthur Capper Cooperative Center. He currently is semi-retired and works part-time on cooperative agribusiness research and education programs in the areas of finance, governance, strategy, and human resources to assist companies, executives and boards of directors improve performance.

Jason BergtoldJason Bergtold
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Virginia Tech, 2004
Production Economics, Natural Resource Economics, Applied Econometrics
bergtold@ksu.edu (785) 532-0984

Dr. Bergtold's research includes: the economics of adopting intensive conservation production systems at the farm level; the impact of bio-energy alternatives and feedstock production on-farm; the interaction between agricultural practices, conservation policy and the environment at the farm level; impact of land-use and land cover change across the agricultural landscape in the U.S. and Latin America; and the development of applied discrete choice econometric modeling techniques. In addition, he has completed research examining consumer demand for processed food products and international trade of peanuts. Dr. Bergtold teaches optimization techniques and econometric methods at the graduate level, as well as quantitative methods and introductory agricultural economics at the undergraduate level.

Mike BolandMichael Boland
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1996
Agribusiness Management, Cooperatives
boland@umn.edu (612) 625-3013

Michael Boland provides information to agribusinesses and cooperatives for use in analyzing alternative managerial decisions. This information is made available through a variety of outlets including case studies, applied publications, and scholarly journals. He has worked or lectured in more than 60 countries on various aspects of agribusiness topics. Before joining the faculty, Dr. Boland gained diverse experience in agribusiness working for a local farm supply cooperative, a regional cooperative, and a state cooperative council.

Brian BriggemannBrian Briggemann
Associate Professor & Arthur Capper Cooperative Center
Ph.D. Purdue University, 2006
Finance, Agribusiness and Cooperative Management, Marketing

bbrigg@ksu.edu (785) 532-2573

Brian Briggeman joined the faculty in Fall 2011. Briggeman earned his bachelor’s degree in agribusiness from K-State in 2000. He received his master’s degree in agricultural economics in 2002 from Texas A&M University. In 2006, he completed his Ph.D. in agricultural economics at Purdue University. Prior to K-State, Briggeman worked as an economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City - Omaha Branch. His research interests include agricultural finance, cooperative and agribusiness management, farm household decision making and macroeconomics. 

Bob BurtonRobert Burton, Jr.
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1982
Farm and Ranch Management
bburton@ksu.edu (785) 532-4436

Dr. Burton led the distance education movement within the department through his undergraduate Farm and Ranch Management course. Dr. Burton has participated in disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, often focusing on risk and return in whole-farm or ranch management. Most recently he has focused his research on farm land ownership as a retirement strategy, agricultural health and safety, and reduced- and no-till cropping systems in Western Kansas.

Brian CoffeyBrian Coffey
Assistant Professor 
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2005
Consumer Demand, Livestock and Meat Economics, Risk Management, Farm and Agribusiness Management, Teaching and Learning
bcoffey@ksu.edu (785) 532-5033

Brian Coffey teaches undergraduate courses in production economics and futures markets. His research is focused on the scholarship of teaching and learning, consumer demand analysis, and livestock economics. Before joining the K-State faculty, Coffey taught for several years in Central Asia and consulted for a variety of small, private agribusinesses in the region.

Tim DaltonTim Dalton
Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1996
International Economic Development; Agricultural Production
tdalton@ksu.edu (785) 532-6941

Dr. Dalton’s research and teaching focuses on international agricultural development in lower income countries. He studies how new crop varieties affect food productivity and production risk management and the impact of natural resource degradation on agricultural development. Dr. Dalton has worked throughout Africa and he is currently researching the economics of drought tolerant maize in southern and eastern Africa.

Allen FeatherstoneAllen Featherstone
Agricultural Economics Department Head, Professor and MAB Program Director
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1986
Finance, Land Markets, Production Economics
afeather@ksu.edu (785) 532-4441

The department’s graduate program has experienced strong growth under the direction of Dr. Featherstone. He guided the development of the Master in Agribusiness degree. His research program has resulted in more than 115 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. As a leading agriculture finance scholar, Dr. Featherstone has assisted the industry on mergers, loan loss severity, the influence of taxes on farm land, and alternative federal tax systems.

Barry FlinchbaughBarry Flinchbaugh
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1971
Food and Agricultural Policy
flinchba@ksu.edu (785) 532-1505

Dr. Flinchbaugh represents the agricultural community through his active participation in the development of U.S. agricultural policy. His service on numerous national task forces, boards of directors, and advisory groups has allowed him to provide input on domestic food and agriculture policy. He served as Chairman of the Commission on 21st Century Production Agriculture authorized in the 1996 FAIR ACT. Flinchbaugh currently serves as Chairman of the board of the Farm Foundation.

Sean FoxJohn (Sean) Fox
Professor and Graduate Coordinator
Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1994
Agricultural Policy, Consumer Demand
seanfox@ksu.edu (785) 532-4446

John (Sean) Fox is a native of Ireland and has been on the faculty at K-State since 1994. His B.S. in Agricultural Science is from University College Dublin and his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Iowa State University. He currently serves as Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Agricultural Economics, and has taught classes in Agricultural Policy, International Trade, Commodity Futures Markets, Managerial Economics, and Applied Econometrics. His research is primarily focused on non-market valuation and involves surveys, market experiments, and retail trials in an effort to quantify consumer valuation of food safety and response to new food products, technologies or information. His work has examined demand for food innovations such as irradiation, cloning, genetic modification, and omega-3 enrichment.

Dan GlickmanDan Glickman
Adjunct Professor
J.D. George Washington University

Dan Glickman has spent more than 25 years in public service on both the federal and local levels, including 18 years in the United States House of Representatives, where he served as a member of the House Agriculture Committee, the House Judiciary Committee, and as chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. In 1995, President Bill Clinton named Glickman Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He serves on the boards of directors of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange; the Food Research and Action Center; and the Farm Foundation. He has a BA in history from the University of Michigan and a JD from George Washington University.

Bill GoldenBill Golden
Research Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2005
Natural Resources, Farm Management
bgolden@ksu.edu (254) 968-8010

Dr. Golden’s general interests include research in natural resources and farm management issues related to irrigation and the production of agricultural commodities. Specifically focusing on evaluating water policy and usage, and the impacts these have on the environment, producers and the regional economy.

Terry GriffinTerry Griffin
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 2006
Cropping Systems, Precision Agriculture, and Farm Management
twgriffin@ksu.edu (785) 532-3527

Dr. Griffin’s research and extension programs are focused in the areas of cropping systems, precision agriculture, and farm management. He grew up on a diversified farm in northeast Arkansas and attended University of Arkansas majoring in Agronomy. He has worked in extension positions at University of Illinois and University of Arkansas and most recently in the private sector prior to coming to Kansas State University. Some of his current research areas include profitability of precision agriculture, ‘big data’ utilization in community farm data, optimizing farm machinery given weather probabilities, and analyzing temporal-spatial trends in Kansas agricultural land values.

 

Orlen GrunewaldOrlen Grunewald
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D. University of Kentucky, 1980
Agribusiness Management
ogrunewa@ksu.edu (785) 532-4443

Dr. Grunewald taught AGEC 701, Introduction to Computer Decisions Tools for Agribusiness. He also taught computer decision tools and commodity futures and options trading in the undergraduate curriculum. He is a major professor on two MAB theses that focus on the Margin Protection Program for dairy and on a business start-up focusing on agriculture technology and information. Dr. Grunewald was born and raised on a farm in Wisconsin and completed his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Wisconsin and Kentucky, respectively.

Cesar GuveleCesar Guvele
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 1998
International Development, Resource Management, Interagency Coordination
cguvele@cox.net

Dr. Guvele has worked in South Sudan on USAID/USDA programs before the signing of a Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) to end the civil war to enable war affected communities to try to fend for themselves with minimum external hand out relief; and after the CPA to rebuild intergovernmental and nongovernmental actions on reducing poverty. He has served as a Senior Advisor on the main USAID’s Agricultural Program (Farming, Agribusiness and Rural Markets (FARM)) in South Sudan through Management Systems International (MSI). Dr. Guvele also took the position of a Senior Associate with Abt Associates assigned to build the farm level agricultural information/data base for USAID’s funded agricultural projects in South Sudan.  He is currently on the Monitoring, Evaluation and Technical Support Service program at Kansas State University. 

Gregg HadleyGregg Hadley
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Michigan State University, 2003
Agriculture and Natural Resources
ghadley@ksu.edu (785) 532-5838

Dr. Hadley is the Assistant Director in charge of agriculture, natural resources and community development programs for K-State Research and Extension. He earned his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics at Purdue University in 1989. He earned his master’s degree in 2001 and Ph.D. in 2003, both in agricultural economics from Michigan State University. Prior to coming to K-State, Hadley worked as an associate professor and extension farm management specialist at the University of Wisconsin - River Falls.

Keith HarrisKeith Harris
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, 2012
Economics and Agribusiness Strategy
kdharris@ksu.edu (785) 532-3918

Keith D. Harris is an Assistant Professor of Agribusiness Management in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University.  His work analyzes of agrifood supply chains within the context of a complex network of differing chain partners and relationships.  As such, the organizational transactions depend on the outcome of other relationships within the chains and networks.  His research area includes agrifood chains for fresh agricultural products (vegetables and fruits) and processed food products (meats and snacks) and it is comprised of growers, auctions, processors, wholesalers, retailers and specialty shops.  Dr. Harris’ research ultimately explores how different companies, who may compete in other chains, collaborate strategically in one or more areas while preserving their own identity and autonomy. Dr. Harris’ academic and industry careers have been dedicated to the food and agriculture industries. He is a food supply chain professional with 20 years of success in global purchasing, and risk management strategies for agricultural commodities. As a practitioner, Dr. Harris held key management responsibilities with companies such as General Mills Inc., Sara Lee Foods Inc., and Smithfield/Farmland Foods before beginning an academic career at Kansas State University. 

 

Nathan HendricksNathan Hendricks
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. University of California, 2011
Supply Analysis, Agricultural Policy, Water Economics and Policy, and Applied Econometrics

nph@ksu.edu (785) 532-3740

The overall goal of Nathan’s research program is to better understand how economic incentives affect the supply of agricultural products and the interaction between agricultural production and the environment and natural resources. This often leads him to focus within three areas: land use, water, and agricultural policy. Some of his previous research has investigated agricultural supply dynamics, the cost-effectiveness of alternative water conservation policies, the production effects of agricultural domestic support programs, and econometric estimation of dynamic panels. He teaches an undergraduate course on contemporary issues in the global food system, a graduate course in agricultural policy, and a graduate team-taught course in quantitative methods.

 

Greg IbendahlGregory Ibendahl
Associate Professor
Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1998

Farm Management and Agricultural Finance
Ibendahl@ksu.edu (785) 477-2071

Prior to joining the K-State faculty, Dr. Ibendahl served as an associate extension professor at Mississippi State University. His specialty areas are farm management and agricultural finance. Ibendahl earned his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in agricultural economics. He also has an MBA from Northern Illinois University. His major focus is working with the Kansas Farm Management Association.

 

Rodney JonesRodney Jones
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. Virginia Tech, 1995
Livestock Production, Economics, General Farm Management
rodney.jones@okstate.edu (580) 237-7677

Dr. Jones conducts research and educational programs in the areas of livestock production economics and farm management. Examples include continuous economic evaluation of various cattle feeding and grazing strategies, as well as swine and sheep production alternatives. He studies the relative profitability and economic efficiency of alternative production systems and management strategies, and evaluates factors that contribute the overall economic risk facing farmers and ranchers. Dr. Jones assists rural business managers in the development of strategic business and transition plans.

 

Terry KastensTerry Kastens
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 1995
Crop and Farm Management
tkastens@kastensinc.com (785) 626-9000

As an emeritus extension agricultural economist, Kastens strives to increase the profitability of those involved in production agriculture, especially in crops production. His main areas of emphasis are land ownership and leasing, machinery management, and technology adoption. He is especially competent in the application of unconventional statistical predictive modeling techniques, for example, neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, and entropy. The purpose is always to generate more accurate mathematical models that help producers, investors, and other agribusiness decision makers increase profit and manage risk.

 

David LambertDavid Lambert
Professor
Ph.D. Oregon State University, 1985
lambertd@ksu.edu (785) 313-0866

Dr. Lambert earned a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from Oregon State University, and master’s and bachelor’s degrees from the University of California, Davis. Prior to his term at K-State, he was Department Chair at North Dakota State University and began his career on the faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno. His background includes teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in microeconomics and quantitative methods, conducting applied economics research, and mentoring and advising undergraduate and graduate students. He has extensive experience in higher education management. His primary research areas are production economics and quantitative methods.

 

John LeathermanJohn Leatherman
Professor
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1995
Local Government
jleather@k-state.edu (785) 532-4492

Dr. Leatherman delivers outreach education programs and conducts applied research related to local economic development policy and practice; public finance and public service provision; and environmental/water quality and local/regional planning. His research interests include state and local public finance; state, regional and local economic development policy; the use of analytical tools (e.g., economic and fiscal impact analysis) to improve local decision-making; and the creation of advanced regional economic models for policy analysis.

Xianghong LiXianghong Li
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. University of California, Davis, 2005
International Trade, Development, Econometrics
xhli@ksu.edu

Dr. Li’s research interests include international trade and development, consumer demand, and applied econometrics. She has conducted research on evaluating trade patterns in various sectors, examining prevailing trade theories, assessing comparative advantage and international competitiveness, and analyzing the impacts of agricultural trade policies on trade flows. Another aspect of her current research focuses on consumer demand for differentiated products and consumer preferences for various product attributes.

Nina LiljaNina Lilja
Associate Professor and Associate Dean, International Agricultural Programs, College of Agriculture and K-State Research and Extension
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1996
nlilja@ksu.edu (785) 532-5627

As Director of International Agricultural Programs (IAP) in the College of Agriculture at K-State, Lilja is responsible for the activities related to international scholars, faculty exchanges and coordination of research partnerships for the COA. Prior to joining K-State she spent 12 years in working for the Consultative Group on International Agricultural research (CGIAR). She was stationed in West Africa and Latin America and she has lead and evaluated global agricultural research projects aimed at poverty alleviation.

Rich LlewelynRich Llewelyn
Extension Assistant
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 1995
Crop Production and Cropping Systems, Farm Management and Risk, Food Market Integration, International Development
rvl@ksu.edu (785) 532-1504

Dr. Llewelyn’s research interests include risk analysis of cropping and tillage systems, production efficiency, production function analysis, and international development. Raised on a farm near Riley, KS, he is a graduate of K-State with a B.S. in Agronomy and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics. Following the completion of his Ph.D. in 1995, he spent 10 years teaching economics and working in rural and urban community development in East Java, Indonesia before returning to Kansas in 2006 to work with the AgManager.info website and departmental extensions conferences and outreach. He also teaches the “Price Analysis and Forecasting” class for undergraduates.

David NormanDavid Norman
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. Oregon State University, 1965
International Agricultural Development
dnorman@ksu.edu (785) 532-4484

Dr. Norman has spent more than 20 years working in national agricultural research systems in Africa (Nigeria and Botswana). Based on this experience, his interests continue to focus on interdisciplinary research and on participatory approaches to agricultural development based on the principles of farming systems research and extension. He currently does short term assignments with many developmental and donor agencies in Asia, Africa, the South Pacific and Latin America.

 

Dan O'BrienDaniel O’Brien
Extension Agricultural Economist - Associate Professor
Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1993
Grain Market Supply-Demand & Price Analysis, Grain Based & Biomass Bioenergy Economics, Grain Industry Transportation and Organization, and Crop Production and Farm Management Issues
dobrien@ksu.edu (785) 462-6281

Dr. O’Brien’s research interests include analysis of feed grain, wheat and oilseed markets, the economics of biofuels production, the structure and performance of the grain and oilseed marketing system, risk management in grain marketing, and irrigated and dryland cropping systems in western Kansas. In his Extension responsibilities he provides analysis of grain market supply and demand factors and prices, as well as grain market price risk management strategies. He also provides analysis of western Kansas irrigated and dryland crop enterprise profitability and cropland leasing arrangements.

Dustin PendellDustin Pendell
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2006
Animal Identification and Traceability, Animal Health Economics, and Livestock and Meat Economics
dpendell@k-state.edu (785) 532-3525

Dustin Pendell’s research interests include livestock and animal health issues that span from the producer through the meat supply chain to the final consumer. Pendell’s interdisciplinary research has been funded by federal agencies and commodity organizations and appears in various academic and outreach publications. Prior to joining K-State, he was on faculty at Colorado State University for nine years where he conducted research on various livestock issues and taught courses in farm management, agricultural marketing and production economics at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Ted SchroederTed Schroeder
Professor
Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1986
Livestock Marketing, Price Analysis
tcs@ksu.edu (785) 532-4488

Dr. Schroeder’s research on livestock marketing and price analysis provides information and direction for the livestock industry. His research focuses on improving commodity market efficiency by investigating price discovery methods, market information, improving market coordinating mechanisms, and forecasting. Ted also teaches agricultural marketing.

 

Bryan SchurleBryan Schurle
Professor
Ph.D. The Ohio State University, 1977
Risk Management, Production Economics
bschurle@ksu.edu (785) 532-4489

Dr. Schurle has taught courses on finance, optimizing techniques, risk management, and principles of agricultural economics. His interests include the application of computer techniques to agribusiness problems. Dr. Schurle’s research and extension efforts are oriented to finance and farm management issues.

Ben SchwabBenjamin Schwab
Assistant Professor
Ph.D.  University of Wisconsin, 2011
International Development, Health and Nutrition
benschwab@ksu.edu

Dr. Schwab’s research focuses on international development, health and nutrition.  Schwab received his PhD in Agricultural and Applied Economics from University of Wisconsin, where he was a National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) trainee in Health Economics and wrote his dissertation on the adoption and impact of vitamin D fortified milk.  Before joining the faculty at Kansas State, Schwab worked at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).  At IFPRI, his research centered on the design and implementation of large scale evaluations of international development projects in East Africa and the Middle East.  Some of Schwab’s current research touches on experimental design, impact evaluation, international food assistance, nutrition, health insurance, the gender wage gap, marriage markets, connections between mental health, stress and economic decision making, and the relationship between agriculture productivity and cash transfer programs. 

Alex ShanoyanAleksan Shanoyan
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Michigan State University, 2011
Agribusiness Strategy and Management, Business Development, & Applied Econometrics
shanoyan@ksu.edu (785) 532-4449

Dr. Shanoyan’s research is in the area of agribusiness management and the economics of agri-food supply chain. His current and previous research projects have addressed issues across number of industries ranging from dairy, meat, and vegetables to grain and biofuel in local, regional, and international contexts. His most recent research projects examine contracting and vertical coordination strategies in biofuel supply chain, risk and cost management strategies of agricultural cooperatives, consumer preferences for food and retail outlet characteristics, and facilitation of supply chain linkages in developing markets. He teaches courses in food and agribusiness management strategies at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Mykel TaylorMykel Taylor
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. North Carolina State University, 2008
Crop Marketing and Farm Management
mtaylor@ksu.edu (785) 532-3033

Dr. Taylor's research and extension programs are focused in the areas of crop marketing and farm management. She grew up on a cattle ranch in Montana and attended Montana State University majoring in Agribusiness Management. She has worked in extension positions at both Kansas State University and Washington State University. Some of her current research areas include measuring basis risk for commodity grains, understanding the implications of 2014 Farm Bill for producers, and analyzing trends in Kansas agricultural land values, rental rates, and leasing arrangements.

 

Glynn Tonsor

Glynn Tonsor
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2006
Livestock Marketing
gtonsor@ksu.edu (785) 532-1518

Dr. Tonsor joined the KSU Agricultural Economics faculty in 2010. He obtained his Ph.D. from KSU in 2006 and was previously employed at Michigan State University. Glynn’s current efforts are primarily devoted to a range of integrated research and extension activities with particular focus on the cattle/beef and swine/pork industries. His broader interests cover aspects throughout the meat supply chain ranging from production level supply issues to end-user consumer demand issues.

Leah TsoodleLeah Tsoodle, C.P.A.
Land Use Value Coordinator
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2005
Land Use
ltsoodle@ksu.edu (785) 532-1517

Dr. Leah J. Tsoodle is the director of the Land Use Value Project and an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University.  Leah received her PhD from Kansas State in 2005.  She works with both undergraduate and graduate students and conducts research in the areas of land values, land rental rates, and rural development.  Leah also maintains a varied outreach program designed to disseminate her research information to various stakeholders in Kansas land markets and economic development groups for rural communities. 

 

 

Nelson VilloriaNelson Villoria
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Purdue University, 2009
International Trade, Agricultural Policy Analysis, and Global Land Use
nvilloria@k-state.edu (785) 532-6702

Nelson Villoria conducts research at the intersection of international trade, development, and the environment. His research seeks to understand how future climates might shape world food markets as well as the interactions between international trade and stockholding as a means of managing price risks as climate variations become more global. He also investigates the competition between agricultural land and forest resources as global agriculture faces mounting pressures to satisfy growing demands for food and biofuels. 

Jeff WilliamsJeff Williams
Professor
Ph.D. Michigan State University, 1980
Farm Management, Risk Management, Natural Resource Economics
jwilliam@ksu.edu (785) 532-4491

Dr. Williams teaches Computer Decision Tools for Agribusiness in the Master of Agribusiness Program. He has worked with several MAB students that have completed economic analyses of investing in new technologies for their agribusiness firms. He also teaches Contemporary Issues in Global Food and Agricultural Systems, Natural Resource and Environmental Economics for undergraduates, and previously taught Advanced Farm Economics for graduate students. Some of his current research includes best management strategies for improving water quality and reducing sedimentation of Kansas reservoirs, evaluating the risk versus returns from alternative cropping and tillage strategies, whole farm revenue insurance and economic issues of biomass production. He is also the recipient of several teaching and research awards.

Christine WilsonChristine Wilson
Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2001
Agribusiness, Finance, Marketing, Farm Management
cwilson1@ksu.edu (785) 532-6151

Dr. Wilson’s research interests include the areas of finance, agribusiness, and agribusiness and farm management issues.  Her research has examined factors affecting lenders loan decision making, agricultural input market segments and the buying behavior of producers and consumers, and the valuation of financial records with experimental auctions. She has taught courses in finance, risk, agribusiness marketing management, farm business accounting, and research methods. Prior to joining K-State in August 2008, Dr. Wilson was a faculty member at Purdue University.

 

Donald WissmanDonald J. Wissman
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 1982
Chairman and Senior Economist, DPRA, Inc., Retired

Dr. Wissman was a founding member of DPRA, a private research and consulting firm, in 1971, and helped grow the company from approximately 10 employees to its present size of 170. His 30 years of service to DPRA covered numerous consulting assignments associated with the economics of food and agriculture, and the environment, with a wide variety of public and private clients in over 20 different countries. During his tenure, Dr. Wissman has authored or co-authored over 80 technical research reports.

Tian XiaTian Xia
Associate Professor
Ph.D. University of California, Davis, 2004
Industrial Organization, Applied Econometrics, & International Trade
tianxia@ksu.edu (785) 532-1512

r. Xia’s research interests include industrial organization in food and agricultural industries, applied econometrics, and international trade and policy. His current research focuses on industrial organization issues such as contracts and vertical coordination, product differentiation, market structure, and competition in food and agricultural industries. His teaching interests are market structure and organization, econometrics, demand and price analysis, and international trade. He teaches a Ph.D. course in agricultural demand and commodity markets and an undergraduate course in international agricultural trade.

Elizabeth YeagerElizabeth Yeager
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Kansas State University, 2011
Production, Finance and Farm Management
eyeager@ksu.edu

Dr. Yeager’s teaching and research programs are focused in the areas of production, finance and farm management. She grew up in rural Kansas and attended Kansas State University majoring in Agricultural Economics. She has worked in teaching and research positions at both Kansas State University and Purdue University. Some of her current research areas include examining firm efficiency and productivity, risk management and repayment risk.

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"We have students who are passionate about, dedicated to, and focused on the agribusiness sector. The fact that they come from different segments of the agribusiness supply chain - input supply, production, processing, marketing, transportation and services, domestic and international - enhances the learning the occurs beyond what I bring to the 'classroom' as the professor."

Vincent Amanor-Boadu
Professor, Agricultural Economics
Kansas State University